Portugal, Spain, and the African Atlantic, 1343-1490
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Portugal, Spain, and the African Atlantic, 1343-1490 chivalry and crusade from John of Gaunt to Henry the Navigator by

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Published by Variorum in Aldershot, Hampshire, Great Britain, Brookfield, Vt., USA .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Portugal,
  • Africa, West,
  • Great Britain,
  • Spain

Subjects:

  • Henry, Infante of Portugal, 1394-1460.,
  • Hundred Years" War, 1339-1453.,
  • Military history, Medieval.,
  • Geography, Medieval.,
  • Portugal -- History -- Period of discoveries, 1385-1580.,
  • Africa, West -- Discovery and exploration -- Portuguese.,
  • Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- 1066-1485.,
  • Portugal -- History -- To 1385.,
  • Spain -- History -- 711-1516.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementP.E. Russell [compiler].
SeriesCollected studies series ;, CS496, Collected studies ;, CS496.
ContributionsRussell, P. E. 1913-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDP559 .P68 1995
The Physical Object
Pagination1 v. (various pagings) :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL783629M
ISBN 100860784746
LC Control Number95015732

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Get this from a library! Portugal, Spain, and the African Atlantic, chivalry and crusade from John of Gaunt to Henry the Navigator. [P E Russell;]. Exploring the Atlantic: Portuguese and Spanish Voyages Before Columbus. Source. African Coast. Portuguese navigators spearheaded Europe ’ s ventures into uncharted waters at the dawn of the age of exploration and expansion. From their homeland at Europe ’ s southwestern tip, early-fifteenth-century Portuguese mariners set out on voyages along the unfamiliar coast of Africa.   Hoping to salvage Portugal’s Atlantic holdings, King João II began negotiations with Spain. The resulting Treaty of Tordesillas in drew a north-to-south line through South America ([link]); Spain gained territory west of the line, while Portugal retained the lands east of the line, including the east coast of : OpenStaxCollege.   This work resituates the Spanish Caribbean as an extension of the Luso-African Atlantic world from the late sixteenth to the mid-seventeenth century, when the union of the Spanish and Portuguese crowns facilitated a surge in the transatlantic slave trade. After the catastrophic decline of Amerindian populations on the islands, two major African provenance zones, first Upper Guinea and .

Hoping to salvage Portugal’s Atlantic holdings, King João II began negotiations with Spain. The resulting Treaty of Tordesillas in drew a north-to-south line through South America; Spain gained territory west of the line, while Portugal retained the lands east . Lisboa, 2ª série, 18, pp. All these works were republished in Spain and the African Atlantic, , Collected Studies Series, Aldershot: Variorum. 6 See also, Macedo Jorge Borges de, A historiografia britânica sobre Portugal: a propósito do centenário . The Portuguese were interested in slaves as well as gold. Arab merchants had bought slaves in West Africa as early as the eighth century, and they continued to act as middlemen when the Europeans arrived. Portugal used African slaves as early as in the sugarcane fields on the islands it took over off the African coast. Russell, P. E., ‘Castilian documentary Sources for the History of the Portuguese Expansion in Guinea in the last years of the Reign of Dom Afonso V’, in Russell, P. E., Portugal, Spain and the African Atlantic – (Aldershot, ).

Under the leadership of Prince Henry the Navigator, Portugal took the principal role during most of the fifteenth century in searching for a route to Asia by sailing south around Africa. In the process, the Portuguese accumulated a wealth of knowledge about navigation and the geography of the Atlantic . In this study of people from Portugal and Spain, % of the Portuguese participants carried L lineages, which is higher than their % frequency in Spain. Such high frequencies are not typical of other Europeans. Haplogroup L is more common in southern Portugal (% frequency) and central Portugal (%) than in northern Portugal. After Belgium, France, and Britain carved up Africa among themselves, Germany felt the need to catch up. W. E. B. Du Bois, who by had established himself as one of America’s leading writers. Romanus pontifex, papal bull of Pope Nicolas V, Portugal, 8 January , courtesy of the Arqivo Nacional da Torre do Tombo, Lisbon, papal bull legally granted Portugal the right to enslave any and all people they encounter south of Cape Bojador, on the coast of Western midway through the bull, the Pope declares all Sub-Saharan Africans henceforth be held in.